From the Daily Mail: News on the Mind and the Alphabet

Why just typing ‘LOL’ makes you happy: People like words made of letters from the right-hand side of the QWERTY keyboard
By ROB WAUGH
UPDATED: 09:11 EST, 8 March 2012

The QWERTY keyboard is shaping how we react to words, say scientists – the effect might be caused by the fact that it’s slightly easier to type with the right hand, as there are fewer letters for touch-typists on the right-hand side of the keyboard
Many workers spend hours a day in front of a QWERTY keyboard on a PC – now scientists have found that the keyboard itself is shaping how we react to words.
Oddly, people tend to react more positively to words filled with letters from the right-hand side of a QWERTY keyboard.
Words from the left side make people feel negative emotions.
Taking a rather unscientific sample, it does seem to make sense – ‘Pool’ is filled with right-side letters, whereas ‘tax’ is all left-side.
The effect seems to come from the keyboard itself – and is dubbed ‘the QWERTY effect’.
The cognitive scientists think that the effect might be caused by the fact that it’s slightly easier to type with the right hand, as there are fewer letters for touch-typists on the right-hand side of the keyboard.
Scientists tested how people reacted using a mix of real words, new words such as ‘LOL’ and even made-up words such as ‘Pleek’.
They found that their volunteers tended to rate ALL words more positively if they came from the right-hand side of the keyboard – but the effect was particularly pronounced with computer-era words such as ‘LOL’.

Notice anything odd? The silly signs that don’t quite get the message across
Words such as ‘LOL’, coined after language ‘shifted’ to the world of keyboards, are particularly vulnerable to the keyboard effect.
LOL is rarely spoken, and mostly typed.

Words with many ‘left side’ letters evoke negative emotions – and words with right side evoke positive feelings, in this slightly unscientific sample

‘When people type words composed of more right-side letters, they have more positive feelings, and when they type words composed of more left-side letters, they have more negative feelings,’ say cognitive scientists Kyle Jasmin of University College London and Daniel Casasanto of The New School for Social Research, New York.
‘People responsible for naming new products, brands, and companies might do well to consider the potential advantages of consulting their keyboards and choosing the ‘right’ name,’ say the researchers.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2111976/Why-tax-makes-unhappy-Scientists-words-left-hand-QWERTY-keyboard-make-people-sad.html#ixzz1oj0fvoXJ

The Middle Ages, Renaissances and Early Modern World

[Note: Syllabus change: You will have the reading/writing day on March 8 instead of March 15. For this week’s blog, you will comment on March 6 and the new March 13 reading. The 15th will be our roundtable and no blogging will be due. This will conclude Project 2.]

Mar. 6: Medieval to Modern Dichotomies

            Shlain, 292-322.

Mar. 8: No class. Research/Writing Day

March 13: Rebellion and Reorganization

          Shlain, 323-392.

on two out of the four categories (Second Project):

  • 3 factual errors and where the correct information can be found
  • 3 omissions (things you needed to know to evaluate his argument)
  • 3 areas of logic or reasoning with you agree or disagree and a brief explanation as to why (see instructions for the Second Project, below)
  • 1 book or article on the week’s topic written after 1990 that he could have cited in his bibliography but did not.

Guest blog by Prof. David Yamada of Suffolk Law School:

This blog post is taken with permission from Minding the Workplace by David Yamada.

A plea for art as vocation and artists as leaders

Feb 21, 2012
by David Yamada

Kayhan Irani
What if our society made more room for artistic expression as a form of vocation and recognized more artists as leaders? Those are among the questions raised by Kayhan Irani, a self-styled “artivist” based in New York who uses her artistic and creative gifts to advance social change.

Kayhan has been a dear friend since 2004, when I invited her to Boston to present “We’ve Come Undone,” her compelling one-woman play about the challenges confronting immigrant women in the post-9/11 era. Since then, I’ve watched her define her vocational role and win plaudits for her artistic work, including a 2010 New York Emmy for a 9-episode educational television drama for immigrant New Yorkers and co-editorship of a book about the use of storytelling to advance social change. (Go here for her interesting and impressive bio.)

Yesterday on her blog, Kayhan asked readers to consider how art (of all types) can be sustaining work and how artists can serve as societal leaders. I wanted to share some of that with you and to offer a few responses.

Art as vocation

Kayhan first takes issue with stereotypes about artists and with assumptions that artistic work should not be a sustaining form of vocation:

“The messages that are broadcast in our society about artists are that we are irresponsible, stupid, drug addicts, mentally ill, have questionable morals; and that art is frivolous, a diversion, not serious work, it’s only for some people, it’s stupid, and can’t pay the bills.  In order to maintain the status quo, we need artists to remain on the fringes of society, barely visible, always teetering on the brink of poverty and irrelevance.”

“These messages get enforced from a very early age.  Imagine an adult asking you, with pleasure, if you are going to be a lawyer or a dancer when you grow up; what about a firefighter or a painter?  From a very young age, we are steered away from art-making as a life choice.”

Artists as leaders

Kayhan concludes by urging us to consider how artistic leadership can be a force for positive social change:

And that brings me to my main point: art and creativity are the most powerful forces we have for liberation.

Art can bring people together.  We don’t even need to speak the same language.

Art can make a way out of no way.  When people are living in oppressive situations, artists can help imagine a way out.  The fight for another world has to imagine that the impossible is possible.

Artists never stop questioning.  Creativity means to use your senses to engage in a process of inquiry.

So let the artists lead us.  Let us recognize that they already do!

Spot on

Kayhan’s call for a world where artistic expression helps us to envision better communities and lives sounds pretty good to me. And it sure would be nice if it was provided by artists who are able to earn a decent living from their work.

I’m not suggesting that we live without formal structures or ditch anything that smacks of “businesslike.” After all, as a lawyer and law professor, I believe that a world without the rule of law would be a pretty scary one. (I’m not exactly enamored with the legal system we have, but that’s for other posts.) And I fully acknowledge that enterprise and technology can bring us some neat stuff, such as the computer I’m using to produce this article.

However, we have got things way, way out of balance. In particular, the financial insanity that led us to the economic meltdown should have prompted a deeper questioning of basic values and major institutions, but I fear we are squandering that opportunity as we yearn for a “recovery” that puts us in a position to do it all over again.

In the meantime, many artists who have been dependent upon outside funding and non-profit sponsorship for their work are struggling even more.

New ways

So…to Kayhan’s eloquent plea I’ll add the need for societal structures that enable artistic work and are not as subject to the boom-and-bust cycles of our casino economy. I confess that I haven’t made all the “third way” connections between this and other forms of sustainable, community-oriented initiatives and enterprises, but I’m sure others have done so. Surely we cannot repeat the mess we’re in, right? Right?