What are some other universities’ policies with respect to faculty training? (Schwell)

Posted by Thomas Burkholder on January 24th, 2013 — Posted in Policies

7 Comments »

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Comment by schwellrac

Response from someone at Rutgers:

Our School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) tries to avoid on-line courses,
but our University has a contract with Pearson to facilitate other units
who do like the idea of on-line.
Training is offered but not required by the university via Pearson

The biggest concerns of SAS are (1) how to know that the person taking
the exams is the person enrolled for credit in the course and (2) will
students actually learn to think as well as to answer quizzes on line?
(3) Will faculty put in the time to attend to on-line chat and
individual appeals for help — or will those functions be delegated to
adjuncts and or to virtual humans (eg FAQ lists)?

Posted on January 29, 2013 at 1:44 pm

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Comment by schwellrac

From someone at Texas A&M:

There is no formal training for online courses. Mostly a new person to
online talks with those of us who have done it for a while and figures
out which of our models, or which combination of our models, suits them
best as a first try and then adjusts from there.

Posted on January 29, 2013 at 1:44 pm

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Comment by schwellrac

From someone at Fitchburg State:

We do not have any training programs for people teaching online courses, although the
college has had many panel discussions, internal speakers, etc, and the Graduate
Continuing Education program held a conference on campus with speakers (internal
speakers) explaining what tools they used for their online courses. Therefore, there
are resources on campus we can use to learn what to do. We also have a “distance
learning coordinator” on campus that helps people get started and answers questions
professors have on the technology. He is also a resource for students who are
having trouble figuring out what to do.

When I designed my online course, I worked closely with the distance learning
coordinator. I had also signed up for a grant for professors who were designing
new online courses and he had to sign off on my course before the course began
in order for me to collect the stipend for creating the course.

Posted on February 2, 2013 at 1:14 am

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Comment by schwellrac

From someone at Sacred Heart:

For our regular online offerings, there is no training that I am aware of. However, we do courses through Deltak. In those cases, the company provides some initial training. But that is more for how they want their online courses to run (Deltak basically rents our accreditation).

Posted on February 5, 2013 at 3:08 pm

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Comment by schwellrac

Two responses from UHart:

1) We have a Faculty Center for Leaning Development (FCLD) that gives a lot of trainings and presentations about different technologies and new teaching methods. I myself have attended a few trainings and talks about Blackboard, Echo360, WebEx, and iPad. They are all voluntary.

2) All of our faculty who wish to teach online must attend the following workshops:

http://www.hartford.edu/academics/faculty/fcld/workshops/default.aspx

Look under the heading of “Preparing to Teach Online Seminar Series”.

Posted on February 5, 2013 at 3:09 pm

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Comment by schwellrac

From an adjunct at SCSU (don’t know what the “other university” is though):

I did teach a course online at another University in the area. It was not a pleasant experience. There was a minimal amount of training in the use of Blackboard and then it was “Good Luck and God Bless You”.

Posted on February 5, 2013 at 3:10 pm

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From someone at UConn:

There was not an official training session we had to undergo, but both of us spent quite a bit of time researching online courses and working with instructional designers and UConn Online administrators here. It was a bit of a different process, I think, because we created our courses prior to teaching them (as opposed to teaching a course that had been pre-designed by someone else). In the course creation phase, we followed quality control guidelines (http://www.qmprogram.org/rubric) that ensured the courses were well-designed.

Posted on February 6, 2013 at 2:43 pm

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